The key to user adoption isn’t spending thousands of dollars in management consulting… It’s giving users software they inherently understand.

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Just about everyone uses Facebook these days. It is, dare we say, ubiquitous. That simple blue navigation bar, with a newsfeed down the middle of the page and various features to left and right? It’s so simple even Grandma gets it (and many, many Grandmas do).
Guess who looks just like Facebook? That’s right, Yammer

That kind of familiarity makes it easy for people to sit down, spin up the app and start communicating with barely a modicum of training or preparation. I don’t want to say that certain tried-and-true principles of organizational change management will no longer apply — there will always be a place for such things — but they become far less necessary when people can intuitively understand how to use an application simply because it works like something they already understand.

SOURCE Rich Wood

Cycling infrastructure scenarios and safety

SOURCE Grist

According to a study from Environmental Health Perspectives, cycling infrastructure is a smart investment for penny-pinching city planners. Taking the city of Auckland in New Zealand as a test case, the researchers looked at simulations of different biking scenarios: a shared-road bike lane network, separated arteries of bike lanes on all main roads, something called “self-explaining roads” with car-slowing design elements, as well as a sweet-spot combination of those separated lanes and self-explaining elements.

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The leanest bike budget could carve some lanes out of existing road surface, but in that scenario, biking’s share of overall trips only increases from 1 to 5 percent

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The leanest bike budget could carve some lanes out of existing road surface, but in that scenario, biking’s share of overall trips only increases from 1 to 5 percent

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Separated bike lanes along all major carways caused cycling traffic to spike to 20 percent…the rate of injury was still almost half of what it was sans-barrier.

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Slowing down cars makes everyone breathe a little easier…The death and injury rate was cut in half, while cars’ share of road trips dropped to 55 percent

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Traffic-calming road design and separated bike lanes…Car use dropped to 40 percent of all traffic, while, in karmically perfect sync, biking rose to 40 percent. Meanwhile, there were 4,000 fewer deaths from lack of physical activity — a much greater risk than pedal-pushing.

Alviani traces the source of much driver contempt toward cyclists to a basic cognitive bias called the fundamental attribution error—basically, a tendency to attribute behavior to personality or disposition, rather than a situation or environment. So, cyclists think they’re above the law because that’s how they are; not, cyclists occasionally make poor riding decisions because the road network wasn’t designed with them in mind.